Day 3 – 2017 D-Blog Week

Click here for The Blame Game – Wednesday 5/17 Link List
Having diabetes often makes a visit to the doctor a dreaded experience, as there is invariably bad news of one kind or another.  And sometimes the way the doctor talks to you can leave you feeling like you’re at fault.  Or maybe you have a fantastic healthcare team, but have experienced blame and judgement from someone else in your life – friend, loved one, complete stranger.  Think about a particularly bad instance, how that person talked to you, the words they used and the conversation you had.  Now, the game part.  Let’s turn this around.  If you could turn that person into a puppet, what would you have them say that would leave you feeling empowered and good about yourself?   Let’s help teach people how to support us, rather than blame us!  (Thank you, Brian, for inspiring this topic.)

I’m reprinting an old post –
(and FYI – The Blame Game has me singing The Name Game all morning – ack!)
(and just the thought of turning that person into a puppet makes me chuckle…)
(Oh, and I have a new, very kind and understanding and caring, boss.)

Dexcom Beeps!

I don’t want to write about this.

I can’t believe I’m writing about this.

Last week – there was a lunch – at work.

I’m the one who orders and picks up the monthly lunches. It’s fun and yummy! And every now and then, it’s a birthday lunch.

It was a Birthday Lunch.  (There was Boston Cream Pie.)

Dexcom went nuts.

And one person made comments about Dexcom’s beepings.

The beeps got annoying and I switched it to vibrate.

The vibrates got annoying and the person said, “What is that?”

I explained that my blood sugar was high and the person said, “Well, yes – YOU ATE CAKE!”

And – I lost it.

I stayed fairly calm. I like my job and even more, I like my health insurance.  And this person – is my boss. Well, sh*t.

BUT – the person needed to know – he was wrong. So I did the old “search thing” for Diabetes Etiquette – and found it/them.

And – I printed the following and put it in this person’s mailbox.

(https://www.diabeteshealth.com/etiquette-for-people-without-diabetes/)

Thank you Dr. Polonsky!

1 – DON’T offer unsolicited advice about my eating or other aspects of diabetes. You may mean well, but giving advice about someone’s personal habits, especially when it is not requested, isn’t very nice. Besides, many of the popularly held beliefs about diabetes (“you should just stop eating sugar”) are out of date or just plain wrong.

2 – DO realize and appreciate that diabetes is hard work. Diabetes management is a full-time job that I didn’t apply for, didn’t want, and can’t quit. It involves thinking about what, when, and how much I eat, while also factoring in exercise, medication, stress, blood sugar monitoring, and so much more – each and every day.

And this morning – in my mailbox.

“I sincerely apologize.”

You know, having Diabetes sucks. Having DOC friends is awesome. Having the GUTS to stick up for myself? Couldn’t have done it without ya!

Thanks DOC!

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Day 2 – D-Blog Week

Click here for the The Cost of a Chronic Illness – Tuesday 5/16 Link List
Insulin and other diabetes medications and supplies can be costly.  Here in the US, insurance status and age (as in Medicare eligibility) can impact both the cost and coverage.  So today, let’s discuss how cost impacts our diabetes care.  Do you have advice to share?  For those outside the US, is cost a concern?  Are there other factors such as accessibility or education that cause barriers to your diabetes care?  (This topic was inspired by suggestions from Rick and Jen.)

I’m getting ready to transition to Medicare – and that scares the sh*t out of me.

Back to Medicare – I’m petrified. We’ve scheduled an appointment with a local woman (she sounds really young but was well recommended by a local insurance agent) to analyze and look at what we can do as far as plans – advantage, supplement, prescription. She said, “You’ll need to have a list of any prescriptions you use.” Poor girl – she’s going to be awed. (Or she might just run away from us!)

I NEVER thought I’d be working at my age. We both worked hard to make it possible to retire and enjoy our retirement. Diabetes brought that to a screeching halt. For new d-friends, I was dx’d at age 55. I’ve said I’d give up my pump before my Dexcom if given a choice. I know they’re approved now but – it looks like there will be some bumps before it, Dexcom, is totally available.

And… it truly and honestly bothers me immensely that there are people who are not able to afford the d-medications that they need to stay alive. Give me a break. NO ONE should be denied medications needed to STAY alive.

PS – I truly LOVE comments and I know everyone else does, too. But… I’m going to do comment catching up after D-Blog week. If I do comments now they’ll all say, “Nice!” or “Thank you for posting this.” I’m really looking forward to meeting new bloggers and catching up with some of “been around for some time” bloggers.

Day 1 – 2017 D-Blog Week

Really? The 8th Year?! How amazing!

Today’s post suggestion: There are two. I chose “good things diabetes has brought into my life.”

  1. All the d people who have become friends through blogging and facebooking
  2. The people I’ve met here in my town because I don’t keep my Diabetes a secret. Two great examples…
    The elderly woman who showed up in my church office holding her meter and lancet who said, “They told me you would help me.” “They” are some women in the church who know I have D and so when the woman was first diagnosed with Type 2 and at a loss as to how to test, they sent her to me.
    The second is a family whose young daughter with Type 1 who uses a pump. They were hesitant to send her to a summer program at the church until another parent said, “Oh, the parish secretary wears a pump! She’ll be there!”
  3. I know how to count carbs. Heck, I know what carbs are.
  4. I am soooooooooooooooo good at shutting up people who ask, “Can you eat that?” I used to teach. I can still teach. And I do!
  5. The D-Parents. You are all amazing!

Life goes on. We all hope and pray for this dreadful disease to be cured. I’m grateful that I found friends who have helped me for the past 12 years.

And that’s a good thing.

Finding the d-bloggers

Way back when… Not really but… When following blogs on a daily basis…

I saved each blog – and there were LOTS of ’em – as a favorite in/on? my browser. And each morning I would click on EACH one to see if that blogger had posted something new in the last day or so.

It was tedious.

Then, it was Amy over at Diabetes Mine who wrote about Google Reader (don’t look for it, it’s gone) and wowee, zowee, it was a miracle. I set up my Reader page and it would do the hard work and let me know when there was a new post on one of my favorite blogs!

And life was much simpler. And I got to read a bunch of d-blogs. And made new friends!

Yay!

Then it (Google Reader) was gone.

I’m not sure how I found Feedly – but I did a couple of years ago. Haven’t used it in awhile but decided it was time to get back to reading and writing blogs. I’ve set it up – again.

Using Karen’s list of participating bloggers for the 8th Annual D-Blog Week!, I’m finding some old friends and some new friends. Have added those to my new Feedly list and am hoping I can keep up with the reading of the blogs.

Especially during D-Blog Week!

Lucky me!

Had an endo appointment today.

I was sure the A1c was going to be the worst ever.

I was sure she’d look at me like I had two heads when she examined my Dexcom and Ping Pump graphs.

As I sat with her- looking at the graphs – the assistant came in with the magic piece of paper, handed it to my doctor who then laughed as she handed it to me.

I felt it was going to be my HIGHEST ever. It wasn’t. I don’t do numbers here but I’m fine. The number was better than usual. I guess I’m not killing myself with Diabetes.

We went over some strategies. We changed two basals. We changed an I-C ratio.

And – I got my flu shot. As an “over 65” person, I get the high test shot.

The Dexcom Clarity thing now goes to them automatically once I sign up. She asked me to use it regularly and just email her if I need some help.

I got in the car – heading north on the interstate and feeling so very lucky to have a physician who gives a rat’s ass about me. Called Moffett who made appropriate “Yippee” responses. The radio was on – The Four Tops-I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch) (released in 1965) – and I giggled.

I’m not a perfect Diabetic – but with the help of d-friends, I can do this.

PS – Thanks Kim Hislop for meeting me for lunch. We’ll have to do that more regularly.2016-10-18

PPS – Charli – Yes, you may ask, “Who are the Four Tops?”

Try to remember…

Here’s the big question. Do I even remember how to do this blog thing?

I’m going to make this one short and sweet. Well, no. I guess it won’t be sweet cuz then I’d have to take insulin and I don’t consider blogging as being Bolus Worthy.

Endo appointment this week. The office is just over an hour away and it should be a not so bad drive. (Fall in NH. People pay big bucks to ride around on buses and check out the “foliage.”) Nicest part? Kim Hislop is going to meet me for lunch before my appointment. I met Kim in Las Vegas at the first Diabetes UnConference. And last month my husband and I both did the JDRF walk with her team in Manchester, NH.

I’m trying to get back on the D-Wagon. Today I did my first Big Blue Test. Number plummeted and as usual I said to myself, “Self – why don’t you do this more often?”

Here’s hoping I get back on the stupid treadmill tomorrow morning before work!

Oh – here’s the photo I used on our Thank You notes that I sent to my JDRF donors!

jdrfwalkphoto