Day 3 – 2017 D-Blog Week

Click here for The Blame Game – Wednesday 5/17 Link List
Having diabetes often makes a visit to the doctor a dreaded experience, as there is invariably bad news of one kind or another.  And sometimes the way the doctor talks to you can leave you feeling like you’re at fault.  Or maybe you have a fantastic healthcare team, but have experienced blame and judgement from someone else in your life – friend, loved one, complete stranger.  Think about a particularly bad instance, how that person talked to you, the words they used and the conversation you had.  Now, the game part.  Let’s turn this around.  If you could turn that person into a puppet, what would you have them say that would leave you feeling empowered and good about yourself?   Let’s help teach people how to support us, rather than blame us!  (Thank you, Brian, for inspiring this topic.)

I’m reprinting an old post –
(and FYI – The Blame Game has me singing The Name Game all morning – ack!)
(and just the thought of turning that person into a puppet makes me chuckle…)
(Oh, and I have a new, very kind and understanding and caring, boss.)

Dexcom Beeps!

I don’t want to write about this.

I can’t believe I’m writing about this.

Last week – there was a lunch – at work.

I’m the one who orders and picks up the monthly lunches. It’s fun and yummy! And every now and then, it’s a birthday lunch.

It was a Birthday Lunch.  (There was Boston Cream Pie.)

Dexcom went nuts.

And one person made comments about Dexcom’s beepings.

The beeps got annoying and I switched it to vibrate.

The vibrates got annoying and the person said, “What is that?”

I explained that my blood sugar was high and the person said, “Well, yes – YOU ATE CAKE!”

And – I lost it.

I stayed fairly calm. I like my job and even more, I like my health insurance.  And this person – is my boss. Well, sh*t.

BUT – the person needed to know – he was wrong. So I did the old “search thing” for Diabetes Etiquette – and found it/them.

And – I printed the following and put it in this person’s mailbox.

(https://www.diabeteshealth.com/etiquette-for-people-without-diabetes/)

Thank you Dr. Polonsky!

1 – DON’T offer unsolicited advice about my eating or other aspects of diabetes. You may mean well, but giving advice about someone’s personal habits, especially when it is not requested, isn’t very nice. Besides, many of the popularly held beliefs about diabetes (“you should just stop eating sugar”) are out of date or just plain wrong.

2 – DO realize and appreciate that diabetes is hard work. Diabetes management is a full-time job that I didn’t apply for, didn’t want, and can’t quit. It involves thinking about what, when, and how much I eat, while also factoring in exercise, medication, stress, blood sugar monitoring, and so much more – each and every day.

And this morning – in my mailbox.

“I sincerely apologize.”

You know, having Diabetes sucks. Having DOC friends is awesome. Having the GUTS to stick up for myself? Couldn’t have done it without ya!

Thanks DOC!

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Over-d’d

Hmmm, almost a month since my last post – didn’t even finish d-blog week.

Oh well.

To be honest, I think I got tired of diabetes. Sure, right – aren’t we all tired of diabetes? Yes, of course.

But I reached a saturation point of reading and writing diabetes. And it’s not like I blog every day by any means. I do read the d-blogs every day though.

I’ve been trying something new – for me. Attempting to pre-bolus breakfast in order to avoid the quick jump to 200 before 10 am each morning.  It’s working, most of the time. When it doesn’t work, it’s usually my fault. So thanks to Melissa at Sweetly Voiced for her kind and helpful responses to my questions.

Today’s challenge was a take out lunch for an office staff meeting. I usually order a salad but today I got a Reuben. Bolused liberally.

And… there was a cake…

This is for Elise, down there in Texas – “to getting a much smaller piece of cake at a birthday party.”
Then because it was a birthday, there was cake. It was chocolate cake. I love chocolate… Had a small, small slice. I ate it in small, small bites. It was yummy. And the very best part??? I got the bolus right and didn’t go high, high, high. I had a great afternoon at work because I didn’t go high, high, high. I thought of Elise when I requested that my slice of cake be a tiny slice of cake. Even when you’re old enough to understand why your piece of cake might be small, it’s still difficult to watch others enjoy a BIG piece of cake. But as I sit here now before dinner with a BG of 130, I feel much, much better about my small, small piece of cake.

And here’s my refrigerator art from Elise!

2013-06-13 003

Let them eat cake!

I know, the quote refers to bread but I’m talking about cake.

My husband was visiting relatives last week. I stayed home with the continuing (…) renovation.

While there, he purchased one of my favorite cakes at a local grocery store to bring home.

A relatives’s husband, a family practice physician, asked,

“Can she eat that?”

M explained that I would definitely eat that, with insulin, and then keep an eye on my Dexcom to make sure all was good.

The physician didn’t know what a CGMS is.

I’ll give him credit. With info from M he went straight to the computer to learn about it.

A couple of years ago, I showed him the first pump he’d ever seen. I also sent him info on LADA, Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, which he knew nothing about at that time.

Sigh………………………..

Oh, the cake.

1/12 of the cake is 47 carbs. And, yes, 1/12 is a very skinny piece of cake, but it’s yummy.