Damn! Resume!

I’m totally loving my T:slim. Love the screen. Love the info. Not a big fan of the refill process but – I’m getting better. Except for RESUME. When doing a cartridge change on the T:slim, you have to stop the insulin delivery. Makes sense, right? But – when you’re done, you have to go hit RESUME or – it doesn’t RESUME.IMG_2263 (640x425)I hit it the first time I changed it all out and felt like I was soooooooooo smart. Since then, I’ve probably forgotten it 50% of the times. So one month times half. What a pain. But – I have faith that I’ll get there and it’s nice that the T:slim screams at you to remind you after some time.

I’m still using my phone as a receiver/sharer as I’ve got leftover supplies and so – haven’t had to process any Dexcom stuff through Medicare. But – that said, I like having the Dexcom number on the pump. I don’t have to punch in a password, I just have to hit the on button on the pump – not so bad. And not so hard at 3am.

Meanwhile, this happened this week. Mowing the yard (it’s not a lawn, it’s a yard) and Dexcom needed its calibration so I came in to calibrate and – the blood went everywhere. It’s not the first time. I’m guessing it won’t be the last time. Just glad I was standing in the kitchen! And yes, that’s one of the well loved and well worn Diabetes UnConference shirts. (http://diabetesunconference.com/)
Christel on FB, “ If you’re going to spray blood on a shirt, that’s the one to do it on.

Spring has finally sprung up here in NH and it’s just loverly!

 

 

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TSA Cares – Really!

Several people have written about contacting TSA for a passenger support specialist to make it easier getting through airport security.

So I did.

And received this reply within 24 hours.
Good afternoon, Ms. Skinner,
I am sorry I was unable to reach you earlier today.  We have received your request for assistance from the TSA Contact Center.  Certainly a  passenger support specialist can be provided to assist you through the checkpoint and the screening process.  When you arrive at the airport feel free to contact the manager on duty, *******.  Either Mr. **** or a checkpoint supervisor will arrange for the PSS to meet you.   Meanwhile, if you have any questions, please give us a call at this office.

Our flight from Manchester to DC was at 5:50 am – crack of dawn. Our PSS met us at the airline desk and from there – life was easy peasy – zip-zip through the lines (got to take “cuts!”). The woman actually thanked me for taking the time to contact them. She said they want to help but can’t if people don’t ask.

And Las Vegas – no contact but – we both ended up as TSA pre-checked. And again, life was good. M zipped right through. I requested a pat-down and so had to take off shoes but that was it. No liquid inspections – and M got to leave his CPap machine in the bag.

Kelly wrote about her good TSA experience in Philadelphia last week – go read it here:
This Trip, A Philly TSA Agent Made Traveling With Diabetes Way LESS Stressful!

So yes, we went to the very first annual Diabetes UnConference. It was awesome. And because we live in New Hampshire where it’s still very, very cold – and there’s still snow on the ground, we stayed the whole week. That was also awesome.

I can’t write about the conference – yet… I will – lots of people are writing lots of good stuff.

I will say that I have to get back to blogging. The blogs were such a TREMENDOUS help to me when I was first diagnosed – 10 years ago this month. And sometimes you think (or I think) well, gee – no one’s reading it so why write it. There were a whole bunch of blog lurkers at the conference and so, you never know who might be helped just by a few words from you. Just knowing that you’re not the only person who forgot to put your pump back on, bolus for a meal, order supplies, etc… is comforting. Trust me – been there done that (and more…).

For now Christel has earned my total respect for making an UnConference such a grand and enjoyable and fun and organized (and warm) UnConference!

Oh – thought I’d be the oldest one there. I wasn’t.
Thought I’d be the one who traveled the farthest. Didn’t happen…

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Medicare, I did it…

In April I will be 65 years old. Holy sh**! Really?

Anyway, I signed up for Medicare this week. It was easy. It was kind of fascinating to see my “earnings” report. Not that I earned much. I was a teacher – Special Education. Then I was a substitute teacher for years while our sons were in school. Then a volunteer thing at the church turned into a job. Moved here to NH and I’m a parish secretary. Being a parish secretary is truly the last thing I ever thought I’d do. To be honest, I never thought of that when it came to, “What I’m going to be when I grow up.”

I won’t be activating the Medicare thing right away as I plan/hope to continue working for awhile. Why? Well, that would be because I have health insurance. I like my Dexcom. I really like my Dexcom. Medicare won’t pay for Dexcoms. (I would give up my pump to keep Dexcom.)

My huge fear – driving without Dexcom. I don’t have a whole lot of lows. And for the most part, I can tell when I’m low. But – driving down/up the interstate? If I’m on the interstate, it usually means I’ve been to a mall or a doctor’s appointment (or lunch with Shannon Lewis!). Malls ( and Targets) create lows for me.  If I’m driving, I sometimes don’t feel the lows. I have Dexcom sitting right on the console. I keep an eye on it. And yes, I’ve pulled off the road to test and treat when needed when I’m by myself. (Juice kept in the car during 3 seasons – Skittles in the winter. I’ve learned I can’t drink a frozen juice box…!)  If my husband and I are together, we stop and switch drivers.

And a night time low? Those are terrible. And scary. If I needed an ambulance in the winter, it might not happen. During the winter, if it’s snowing, they wouldn’t even be able to get an ambulance up our road. I have asked what would happen. They would have to walk up with a sled thing if needed. It could take awhile. I might send Medicare a photo of my snowy road.

I’m extremely fortunate, really! I like my job. I like the people I work with each day. I like the parishioners. I like my 5 minute commute. So – working more? It’s okay. It’s actually very good. (I’m trying so hard to NOT say, “It’s a good thing.”)
goodthing
PS – Thanks to Kim Vlasnik, I can even insert the Dexcom in my arm, by myself. And this past week – I got one into my right arm using my left hand (I’m right handed). (Yay me!!!) I didn’t think I could do it. But – I can do this.

PPS – We’re going to the Diabetes UnConference in March. I’m hoping there will be no snow in LasVegas while we’re there.