Day 3 – 2017 D-Blog Week

Click here for The Blame Game – Wednesday 5/17 Link List
Having diabetes often makes a visit to the doctor a dreaded experience, as there is invariably bad news of one kind or another.  And sometimes the way the doctor talks to you can leave you feeling like you’re at fault.  Or maybe you have a fantastic healthcare team, but have experienced blame and judgement from someone else in your life – friend, loved one, complete stranger.  Think about a particularly bad instance, how that person talked to you, the words they used and the conversation you had.  Now, the game part.  Let’s turn this around.  If you could turn that person into a puppet, what would you have them say that would leave you feeling empowered and good about yourself?   Let’s help teach people how to support us, rather than blame us!  (Thank you, Brian, for inspiring this topic.)

I’m reprinting an old post –
(and FYI – The Blame Game has me singing The Name Game all morning – ack!)
(and just the thought of turning that person into a puppet makes me chuckle…)
(Oh, and I have a new, very kind and understanding and caring, boss.)

Dexcom Beeps!

I don’t want to write about this.

I can’t believe I’m writing about this.

Last week – there was a lunch – at work.

I’m the one who orders and picks up the monthly lunches. It’s fun and yummy! And every now and then, it’s a birthday lunch.

It was a Birthday Lunch.  (There was Boston Cream Pie.)

Dexcom went nuts.

And one person made comments about Dexcom’s beepings.

The beeps got annoying and I switched it to vibrate.

The vibrates got annoying and the person said, “What is that?”

I explained that my blood sugar was high and the person said, “Well, yes – YOU ATE CAKE!”

And – I lost it.

I stayed fairly calm. I like my job and even more, I like my health insurance.  And this person – is my boss. Well, sh*t.

BUT – the person needed to know – he was wrong. So I did the old “search thing” for Diabetes Etiquette – and found it/them.

And – I printed the following and put it in this person’s mailbox.

(https://www.diabeteshealth.com/etiquette-for-people-without-diabetes/)

Thank you Dr. Polonsky!

1 – DON’T offer unsolicited advice about my eating or other aspects of diabetes. You may mean well, but giving advice about someone’s personal habits, especially when it is not requested, isn’t very nice. Besides, many of the popularly held beliefs about diabetes (“you should just stop eating sugar”) are out of date or just plain wrong.

2 – DO realize and appreciate that diabetes is hard work. Diabetes management is a full-time job that I didn’t apply for, didn’t want, and can’t quit. It involves thinking about what, when, and how much I eat, while also factoring in exercise, medication, stress, blood sugar monitoring, and so much more – each and every day.

And this morning – in my mailbox.

“I sincerely apologize.”

You know, having Diabetes sucks. Having DOC friends is awesome. Having the GUTS to stick up for myself? Couldn’t have done it without ya!

Thanks DOC!

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Try to remember…

Here’s the big question. Do I even remember how to do this blog thing?

I’m going to make this one short and sweet. Well, no. I guess it won’t be sweet cuz then I’d have to take insulin and I don’t consider blogging as being Bolus Worthy.

Endo appointment this week. The office is just over an hour away and it should be a not so bad drive. (Fall in NH. People pay big bucks to ride around on buses and check out the “foliage.”) Nicest part? Kim Hislop is going to meet me for lunch before my appointment. I met Kim in Las Vegas at the first Diabetes UnConference. And last month my husband and I both did the JDRF walk with her team in Manchester, NH.

I’m trying to get back on the D-Wagon. Today I did my first Big Blue Test. Number plummeted and as usual I said to myself, “Self – why don’t you do this more often?”

Here’s hoping I get back on the stupid treadmill tomorrow morning before work!

Oh – here’s the photo I used on our Thank You notes that I sent to my JDRF donors!

jdrfwalkphoto

2016 Diabetes Blog Week – Tuesday

2016-BlogWeekClick for the Link List:
The Other Half of Diabetes – Tuesday 5/17
We think a lot about the physical component of diabetes, but the mental component is just as significant. How does diabetes affect you or your loved one mentally or emotionally? How have you learned to deal with the mental aspect of the condition? Any tips, positive phrases, mantras, or ideas to share on getting out of a diabetes funk?

The mental part? Like with any chronic disease, there are good and bad and even some “blah, who cares?” days. And some days I truly begin to doubt myself and my ability to treat my own diabetes. And other days I think I’m the queen of d-care.

The rest of the days? I think I’m probably nuts.

The love of my life – my husband – is my rock, and God only knows how he puts up with my bitching and moaning some days. (And Karen, he just brought a slice of lime for my drink!) After collapsing and falling sound asleep some nights, he’s the one who will stay up and watch the Dexcom numbers if there’s an issue. I hate, hate, hate that he has to do that. I know that he doesn’t have to do that. But he does. And it makes me sad and it makes me angry. But mostly, it makes me happy. I won’t mention the guilt…

No tips – well, one tip. Become active in the DOC. Connect on FB, create your own blog, do the Twitter thing (I still don’t know how…). Join a support group if you have one. When I first started pumping I attended a great group. I drove over an hour to meet them. It was worth it and I’m so grateful that I had that opportunity. They don’t meet any longer. Wish they did. It was sponsored by Animas and I loved being able to meet other d-people and pumper people.

Just do something so you won’t feel so alone.

Dexcom Beeps!

I don’t want to write about this.

I can’t believe I’m writing about this.

Last week – there was a lunch – at work.

I’m the one who orders and picks up the monthly lunches. It’s fun and yummy! And every now and then, it’s a birthday lunch.

It was a Birthday Lunch.  (There was Boston Cream Pie.)

Dexcom went nuts.

And one person made comments about Dexcom’s beepings.

The beeps got annoying and I switched it to vibrate.

The vibrates got annoying and the person said, “What is that?”

I explained that my blood sugar was high and the person said, “Well, yes – YOU ATE CAKE!”

And – I lost it.

I stayed fairly calm. I like my job and even more, I like my health insurance.  And this person – is my boss. Well, sh*t.

BUT – the person needed to know – he was wrong. So I did the old “search thing” for Diabetes Etiquette – and found it/them.

And – I printed the following and put it in this person’s mailbox.

Thank you Dr. Polonsky!

1 – DON’T offer unsolicited advice about my eating or other aspects of diabetes. You may mean well, but giving advice about someone’s personal habits, especially when it is not requested, isn’t very nice. Besides, many of the popularly held beliefs about diabetes (“you should just stop eating sugar”) are out of date or just plain wrong.

2 – DO realize and appreciate that diabetes is hard work. Diabetes management is a full-time job that I didn’t apply for, didn’t want, and can’t quit. It involves thinking about what, when, and how much I eat, while also factoring in exercise, medication, stress, blood sugar monitoring, and so much more – each and every day.

And this morning – in my mailbox.

“I sincerely apologize.”

You know, having Diabetes sucks. Having DOC friends is awesome. Having the GUTS to stick up for myself? Couldn’t have done it without ya!

Thanks DOC!

 

Medicare, I did it…

In April I will be 65 years old. Holy sh**! Really?

Anyway, I signed up for Medicare this week. It was easy. It was kind of fascinating to see my “earnings” report. Not that I earned much. I was a teacher – Special Education. Then I was a substitute teacher for years while our sons were in school. Then a volunteer thing at the church turned into a job. Moved here to NH and I’m a parish secretary. Being a parish secretary is truly the last thing I ever thought I’d do. To be honest, I never thought of that when it came to, “What I’m going to be when I grow up.”

I won’t be activating the Medicare thing right away as I plan/hope to continue working for awhile. Why? Well, that would be because I have health insurance. I like my Dexcom. I really like my Dexcom. Medicare won’t pay for Dexcoms. (I would give up my pump to keep Dexcom.)

My huge fear – driving without Dexcom. I don’t have a whole lot of lows. And for the most part, I can tell when I’m low. But – driving down/up the interstate? If I’m on the interstate, it usually means I’ve been to a mall or a doctor’s appointment (or lunch with Shannon Lewis!). Malls ( and Targets) create lows for me.  If I’m driving, I sometimes don’t feel the lows. I have Dexcom sitting right on the console. I keep an eye on it. And yes, I’ve pulled off the road to test and treat when needed when I’m by myself. (Juice kept in the car during 3 seasons – Skittles in the winter. I’ve learned I can’t drink a frozen juice box…!)  If my husband and I are together, we stop and switch drivers.

And a night time low? Those are terrible. And scary. If I needed an ambulance in the winter, it might not happen. During the winter, if it’s snowing, they wouldn’t even be able to get an ambulance up our road. I have asked what would happen. They would have to walk up with a sled thing if needed. It could take awhile. I might send Medicare a photo of my snowy road.

I’m extremely fortunate, really! I like my job. I like the people I work with each day. I like the parishioners. I like my 5 minute commute. So – working more? It’s okay. It’s actually very good. (I’m trying so hard to NOT say, “It’s a good thing.”)
goodthing
PS – Thanks to Kim Vlasnik, I can even insert the Dexcom in my arm, by myself. And this past week – I got one into my right arm using my left hand (I’m right handed). (Yay me!!!) I didn’t think I could do it. But – I can do this.

PPS – We’re going to the Diabetes UnConference in March. I’m hoping there will be no snow in LasVegas while we’re there.

D-Blog Week – Wednesday

This is ridiculous! It’s almost 6pm on Tuesday night. I want to read more of the poetry (what a great topic – and boy do we have a whole lot of talented d-bloggers!), but until just now, I wasn’t even sure what tomorrow’s topic is and needless to say, haven’t written a damn word.

And I have to eat dinner at some point. Thankfully, I don’t have to fix it as my resident poet (my very own Type 3) does the cooking around here.

Click for the What Brings Me Down – Wednesday 5/14 Link List.
May is Mental Health Month so now seems like a great time to explore the emotional side of living with, or caring for someone with, diabetes. What things can make dealing with diabetes an emotional issue for you and / or your loved one, and how do you cope? (Thanks go out to Scott of Strangely Diabetic for coordinating this topic.)

I’ve met Scott. He’s really, really nice. He has the most engaging smile. He almost makes me wish we still lived in KC – almost…

I will totally give some credit to my PCP for alerting me to keeping an eye on my own mood(s) after the d diagnosis. I had a bunch of cr*p going on when I was diagnosed and my life already pretty much was kinda sucky. And then, the d-thing arrived. Not fun.

I have bad days, just like everyone else. But I recognize that “having a bad day” is nothing compared to those who deal with depression. But I totally appreciate and respect that the depression word/subject/idea is brought up here in the DOC. You never know who is going to get/find help, just because they recognized themselves in someone’s post.

So how do I cope? Sometimes, I don’t. I go bananas. I cry hysterically. I blame anyone who’s within five feet of me (yep, guess who that would be?).

Other times, I’m a little more controlled and I read, I compute, I watch dumb TV (house hunters saves me because some of them are so stupid they make me feel brilliant) and now that it’s almost summer, I’ll go work in the yard. (Stupid weeds!)

And then there are the d-bloggers and d-fbers. Without them, I’d be so scared. And I love that we all share more than just d-stuff. Flowers – Pets! – Recipes (yes, even the vegan ones) – Children’s Photos – Grandchildren’s Photos – Vacation Photos – you get the idea.

I guess I have to say, living in this DOC neighborhood of ours
makes living with diabetes
somewhat easier to cope with each and every day.

And – a final thought. If you’re reading this and you got here through Karen’s D-Blog Week list, take a few minutes to click on a blog there that you’ve never read and then, gasp, leave a comment. Sometimes, after taking the time to start a d-blog and move into the DOC neighborhood, it’s hard to feel like you’re getting to know anyone. We can all give one person a smile just by saying hello and saying something nice. You can skip commenting here – I’m fine today.

 

 

 

Are we there yet?

I am sooooo ready for spring! Are we there yet?

Nope –

I’ve been having massive high bgs for the last couple of days – and a couple of low bgs just to make life interesting. And, they make me feel like I know nothing but, I’m not going to worry about it.

I’ve said this before, and I’m going to say it now, and I’ll probably say it again, and maybe even again.

Thanks to those people who write about their own diabetes and/or their kids’ diabetes…

I don’t have guilt for the highs – or – the lows. Sometimes I can pinpoint a high, sometimes I can’t.

The highs might be the result of a steroid thing that I’m using for post nasal drip (ick, not something I ever thought I would have, let alone write about). After 4 days of squirting that stuff into my head, it seems to have solved the problem and I should be able to stop using it soon. The lows – who knows? It just might be the over-correcting I’m doing from the highs and so, I go low.

It’s such a mystery and I’ve decided to just go with the flow. Drink the juice or take the insulin – whatever is required.

KerriSparlingI’m reading Kerri’s book, enjoying it, smiling and feeling like she’s sitting across the table from me just chatting away. I bought an extra copy for a local mom with a “d” daughter. She doesn’t spend a lot of time online – two kids, job, husband, life – keeps her busy. I hope she’ll make time to read Kerri’s thoughts (and those of everyone else who contributed to her book!).

And – tonight’s site change. And this one was just like the Maxwell House Coffee Ad – “Good to the Last Drop.”

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