Me & the Anesthesiologist

And by the way, he was one of the cutest anesthesiologists I’ve ever seen. Not that I’ve met a whole lot of anesthesiologists…

When you reach a certain age, a colonoscopy is recommended. The one this week was my third. I’m on the five year plan as they’ve found and removed polyps each time. I don’t whine as I had two good friends who died due to colon cancer.

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And as much as I hate, hate, hate doing the prep thing… I really, really hate it…

And this year, I decided to fix an abdominal hernia that was becoming annoying.

So I did both this week. (Oh, and my husband is a saint.)

2015-04-08I did the prep. My blood sugars were really quite amazing during the entire time. A couple of quick lows that a few sips of regular ginger ale took care of nicely.

Arrived at the hospital at 8am and began the whole prep for surgery thing. (And Dexcom and the hospital meter matched – the nurse was awed. So was I…) This was my first time with general anesthesia (2 C-sections but that’s been all). The nurses were awesome and everyone wanted to look at Dexcom. They hadn’t seen one. And they wanted to know who implanted the Dexcom transmitter… They were surprised when I said I did it once a week – by myself.

I cannot tell you how many times this was said, “You must be a very brittle diabetic.”

Um, no. The pump and the cgms are tools used by any person with diabetes. Even the youngest children have them. “Really?!”

And then the anesthesiologist arrived. And he asked how to work the Ping and the Dexcom. Quick lesson with a strong reminder that a finger stick had to be done as confirmation of any Dex info that was going to result in insulin or glucose –  and I was down the hall and out. The Dexcom was placed on a tray – and the Ping was hooked to my hospital gown’s neck. I checked my dex and history button later and there was a 200 with a one unit bolus halfway through the surgery.

When I saw the anesthesiologist after, I told him it was awesome that he’d used them. He wanted more info about Dex. I told him I was especially appreciative of the Dexcom when driving.  He told me his father had Type 1 and had a car accident due to a hypo. I told him I’ve had several times where I either pulled over to treat or didn’t even leave work when Dexcom alerted me to a lower blood sugar.

So, my innards got cleaned and checked and I’m good for another five years.

And the weird lump on my abdominal area is gone (well, I think it is – there’s a huge bandage there right now – I get to take it off and joy, joy take a shower tomorrow!).

Oh – and one of the nurses has a sister with Type 2. She said she knows her sister wishes she had someone to talk to about Diabetes. I let her know about the DOC and will be sending her some blog addresses.

Oh – then it snowed last night. A couple of inches. Sigh…

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The “High” Day

I’ve been high (200+) all day. I kept testing. I Pinged insulin. I continued to hit the buttons on Dexcom so it would stop beeping at me. I drank lots of water.

I finally pulled my inset and redid it all after lunch. Threw out 32 units of insulin! It looked fine – no blood, not bent. WTH?

Then I attempted to take a nap. I shut off the high alert on Dexcom so I could sleep. But – Dexcom did a sensor failure and made a whole lot of noise. So I woke up.

I’m still waiting for my 2 hours “wake up and test” from Dexcom but when I tested last I was finally at a reasonable number, 128.

Dexcom just requested my 2 tests – results are 75 & 88. Dexcom now says 77.

It’s fascinating…

And when I told M Dexcom’s number, he said, “Kookie, Kookie, lend me your comb.” You probably have to be our age to “get that.”

American Bandstand – yes, I watched this. But I was very young! I love finding stuff like this on YouTube!

 

You want to go where? Why?

While in Virginia a couple of weeks ago, one of the hotels we stayed at was right down the street from a Target. I told M we had to go there so I could see if the “Target LOW” would happen to me. He thought I was nuts but that’s not that unusual…

I was introduced to Target many years ago when visiting my sister in Apple Valley, near Minneapolis. She taught me the correct pronunciation and told me to never wear a red shirt when shopping at Target. (“Tarjay” – and the staff wears red shirts.) So, I was all set when Target showed up in the KC area, and it was nice. But, I didn’t have T1 Diabetes then.

Now, up here in the boonies, the closest Target is 45 minutes south of us via the interstate. I don’t get there much.

But – here one was, right down the street. So we went to Target.

We wandered around happily for 30 minutes or so and yup, Dexcom beeped, I tested, and my bg was low. The husband was awed that I could predict this happening. I told him everyone in the DOC goes low at Target.

I’d like to think – hmmm, we could all just go to Target instead of taking Insulin. But when I go to Target, it’s not cheap, so maybe just Pinging my insulin is a cheaper idea.

Just think… What if I didn’t read d-blogs? That low in Target might have been a complete surprise!

Thank you d-bloggers.

Congratulations to everyone who rode for JDRF today in Death Valley!
Thanks also to everyone who contributed to their rides.
My dream is the same – Find a cure for this disease!

Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Target_Corporation

Flunking Eating Out

If there was a grade for eating out, I’d flunk. My SWAG skills are truly lacking since embarking on this road trip. But, I’ve decided I’m not going to worry about it, too much…

We don’t eat out very often at home for several reasons. One, my husband has turned into a great cook. Two, eating out in the summer means we line up with all of the tourists (not fun). Three, eating out in the winter means we watch the weather closely so we can be sure to get home if the weather is bad (we live on a slippery hill). And finally, we’re cheap…

Tonight I decided to do a better job. Well, sort of… I left my carb book at home and I don’t have a smart phone to look up counts. We were at Houlihans (which we don’t have up in our boonies). I had the chop salad (I removed every single crouton!) and a cup of baked potato soup. I should have asked for nutrition info, but I didn’t. Looked them up when we got back to the hotel and turns out I did okay on the carb numbers but – I’m high anyway.

It’s on its way down. I know I’ll live. But it’s annoying.

But – we’re visiting people we haven’t seen in a long time. We’re going to a newly opened restaurant (owned by a friend’s son) later this week (in Suffolk, Virginia). And you know; I’ll count, I’ll test, I’ll Ping. But, for this week, I’m going to put diabetes in the back seat and try to ignore it, safely…

And next week, back to my normal, carb conscious self.

Oh, nicest surprise this morning? We’re at a Hampton Inn and – there was sugar free strawberry jelly at the breakfast bar, which I slathered on a yummy biscuit.

What a Great Endo Appointment!

I’m going to wait to title this (hope I don’t forget…).
I’m writing a post on a Friday night… but the night sounds are beautiful, the acorns keep falling and bouncing on the deck. It’s really quite nice…

Went to the endo today. Second appointment with Endo #4. I loved the first appointment and today, well, today was even better.

The office is a little over an hour away. It was a simply gorgeous day for driving down I93. Not much traffic as I was heading south and the sun was shining and I had the radio loud and since I was by myself, I could sing!

Arm is still paining so I also did some arm stretching since it’s my right arm and no one was in the passenger seat.

I cannot imagine what anyone thought if they saw this person with her arm stretched out and obviously talking/singing to no one. Oh well.

I’d done all the requested lab work back in June before my PCP appointment and just to be sure, had faxed everything to the endo’s office this week. Even called to make sure they got it.

I uploaded my Ping to Diasend (had some problems, called, had to wait for a call back when Christy politely reminded me that I had to suspend the pump before it would connect… I knew that. I just didn’t do that…) Incidentally, it uploaded much faster than it has in the past. Yay!

I let Dr. G know via email that my info was on Diasend and she let me know that she’d gotten it and was concerned about the lows the last couple of weeks. I’m calling it the Advil treatment.

So, the nurse, whom I hadn’t met, did the weight, BP and A1c. (The MA was out sick.) She’s also the CDE, was dx’d at 17, wears a Ping and a Dexcom. She came back in a few minutes with an orange sticky and I asked for the number. She gave it to me and I did a little cheer. I don’t like posting A1c’s but, today’s was the lowest since I was diagnosed back in 2005.

Dr. G. came in and we talked about the lows. She suggested I work with temporary basals more often to help. She sat next to me and basically said I’m doing great. She said she’s awed with my understanding of d and working with carbs, insulin and the pump.

AND I TOLD HER…
I wouldn’t be where I am today without the d-bloggers. I told her I don’t panic because someone else has already posted a similar situation. I SWAG because I’ve learned from some of the best. I choose what to eat because I’ve learned from some of the best. I thoroughly enjoyed a (small) piece of Key Lime pie yesterday because – you know… I told her about writing about my bent cannula and feeling stupid and that people commented (thank you!) and let me know I wasn’t stupid – that Karen said, “Diabetes is stupid!” She laughed. And then I told her about Meri, and the boys, and Ryan – and she got tears in her eyes. I told her I’ve not met most of these people but that I depend on them for support, hugs, advice.

Called M as soon as I got to the parking lot and just said the number – and he was appropriately congratulatory.

Did some shopping on the way back north. Went to Chili’s by myself and ate a cheeseburger and less than half of the fries!

And so, as I’ve said in the past, thank you to everyone who takes the time to write about their diabetes. It’s kept me sane – well, as sane as I can be these days…

Love you all!

What a rotten night!

From last week, but not posted until today, because I’m still somewhat hesitant of putting my stupidity out on the WWW…

20 hours of “How could I be so stupid?”

As I finally figured out this morning that it was a bad – crunched – bent cannula that had been causing my high, high, this sucks blood sugars since about 2 pm yesterday, it came to me that having diabetes is like having a baby. Sometimes you try everything in your brain to make your baby comfortable and after all that rocking, singing, feeding, changing, burping, etc… it turns out to be something simple that is causing all the crying.

Just before lunch on Wednesday, at the office, I snagged my inset (on my leg) (yes, I was in the bathroom...) on my pants (actually, it was the Dexcom in my pocket that caught it…) and – it fell out. No big deal, I had a spare ready (unlike the last time). (See, I do learn from my mistakes.) Inserted the inset, bolused for lunch and continued working through the afternoon. Dexcom buzzed and since I’ve been spiking some days, I didn’t worry about it. At 3:30, the meter said 303. Not good. I did a correction, closed the office at 4, and came home. By 5 it was even higher. I even tested for ketones – they were there, but not bad. I had the new inset so decided to open a new vial of insulin and just do a reservoir change.

Morning – well, before morning… Dexcom woke me at 5 to tell me I was over 300.

And here’s where I got stupid (or tired, or high, or fed up).
I did a correction. I drank water. I waited.
No change…
So I decided to use one of my Novolog pens and see if that would help. Being cautious (and tired, high) I just did 2 units.
And went back to bed.
Woke up around 7:00, laid in the bed thinking. Tested, no real change and wondered if I’d used Novolog or not.

I didn’t – it was Levemir. So that didn’t help…

Took off the inset below.
I know, it’s a fuzzy photo – so was I when I took it.

Cursed…

Over corrected, because the Ping thinks I’ve had gobs of insulin. I must have been getting some, but certainly not much. I called the office and said I was sick. That’s a first.

And by noon, all was good. But I still felt like a blob of nothing.

As I sat here this morning feeling sorry for myself, I did, as I almost always do, think of the children who deal with this, think of the DOC people who grew up with this.

I know stuff happens. I know we all have bad days/nights. I know I can’t be perfect. I know I’m lucky to have the DOC available.

And yeah, I also know that the inset is probably the first thing I should have ripped out. Oh well…